What do you regret not doing in your 20’s?

Those Who are in their 20’s can Learn from This.

Top Answer by June Chan

It’s not regret. But looking back, it seems my life would have been better if I had done / had known these earlier:

  • On love: Leave an unhappy relationship. It’s not about commitment. It’s about how to respect yourself.
  • On work: Quit an unhappy job. The feeling of being caged, deprived of the opportunity to learn new things simply because of your role – are not compensated by pay or even gratification of supporting your loved ones.
  • On emotion: Appreciate, listen to, even indulge in emotions sometimes. It keeps a human life. No worries, we’re rational enough. Our brain is amazing.
  • On body: Have happy (safe) sex more and earlier. Play fun sports more and earlier. Feeling a cramp in my leg once saved me from depression due to overthinking.
  • On money: More is not better. There’s a threshold over which you feel secured and free to pursue your dreams. Work constantly to lower this threshold. It frees you from constraints that you set for yourself.
  • On desire/passion: It’s OK that desire/passion changes over time. Someday the dots can be linked. Before that, follow the passion even as it takes leaps and seems without focus.
  • On fear: Never act/decide out of fear. You’re doomed. Lying is an example.
  • On people: Stay around those you want to become. If your network is not given, create it yourself.
  • On human life: You can change your life. Be kind, be honest (to others and to yourself), be grateful. Genuine happiness triumphs.

Regret is a self-referencing concept in the sense that you only become the person with regret because you were once the person you now feel regret on.

Maybe some journey must be traveled in order to learn from it. Maybe we should be grateful that, finally, we realize what we regret. Then everything is worth it.

Things I’m glad that I did early on:

  • On family: Invest in it heavily. They may disappoint you. But they’re (usually) there to cheer you up when the world disappoints you. (maybe I’m the lucky one)
  • On knowledge: Read a lot. Study logic and philosophy. Master a second language that represents a different culture. It changes the way you think.

Read All Answers on Quora.

Those who have crossed their 20’s can contribute for others to learn by commenting on it.

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Things to do Before I Die

I Always Thought of Putting up a Bucket List of Things I Wanted to Do, And see how Much I can Accomplish.

1)      Sky Diving

2)      Scooba Diving

3)      Hitch Hicking across the Country

4)      Living a Minimalist Life (Maximum 10 Items)

5)      Spending a week without money and other necessities

6)      Educating an unprivileged child

7)      Meet Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee

8)      Meet Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam

9)      Meet Lance Armstrong

10)   Meet Field Marshal SHFJ Manekshaw (Unfortunately He Passed Away in Jun 2008)

11)   Own a Stock Brokerage Firm

12)   Start An Educational Institution

13)   Work in a Non Profit, NGO

14)   Join Politics

15)   Fall in Love

16)   White Water Rafting

17)   Bungee Jumping from a Cliff

18)   Run a Complete Marathon

19)   Complete Four Deserts Race

20)   Own a Library

21)   Direct a Movie

22)   A 1000+ Km Road Trip By Bike

23)   Give a TED Talk

24)  Appear on the Cover of TIME Magazine

And a Lot more to Come in Future, if you have any please add them in the Comments Section.

Please Get in Touch If you Can help me out in any of The Above

My Bucket List

I Always Thought of Putting up a Bucket List of Things I Wanted to Do, And see how Much I can Accomplish.

1)      Sky Diving

2)      Scooba Diving

3)      Hitch Hicking across the Country

4)      Living a Minimalist Life (Maximum 10 Items)

5)      Spending a week without money and other necessities

6)      Educating an unprivileged child

7)      Meet Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee

8)      Meet Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam

9)      Meet Lance Armstrong

10)   Meet Field Marshal SHFJ Manekshaw (Unfortunately He Passed Away in Jun 2008)

11)   Own a Stock Brokerage Firm

12)   Start An Educational Institution

13)   Work in a Non Profit, NGO

14)   Join Politics

15)   Fall in Love

16)   White Water Rafting

17)   Bungee Jumping from a Cliff

18)   Run a Complete Marathon

19)   Complete Four Deserts Race

20)   Own a Library

21)   Direct a Movie

22)   A 1000+ Km Road Trip By Bike

23)   Give a TED Talk

And a Lot more to Come in Future, if you have any please add them in the Comments Section.

Beer and The Tax System

 

Suppose that every day, ten men go out for beer and the bill for all ten comes to $100. If they paid their bill the way we pay our taxes, it would go something like this:

The first four men (the poorest) would pay nothing.
The fifth would pay $1.
The sixth would pay $3.
The seventh would pay $7.
The eighth would pay $12.
The ninth would pay $18.
The tenth man (the richest) would pay $59.

So, that’s what they decided to do. The ten men drank in the bar every day and seemed quite happy with the arrangement, until one day, the owner threw them a curve. He said, “Since you are all such good customers, I’m going to reduce the cost of your daily beer by $20. Drinks for the ten now cost just $80.”

The group still wanted to pay their bill the way we pay our taxes, so the first four men were unaffected. They would still drink for free. But what about the other six men — the paying customers?

How could they divide the $20 windfall so that everyone would get his “fair share”? They realized that $20 divided by six is $3.33. But if they subtracted that from every body’s share, then the fifth man and the sixth man would each end up being paid to drink his beer. So the bar owner suggested that it would be fair to reduce each man’s bill by roughly the same amount, and he proceeded to work out the amounts each should pay!

And so:
The fifth man, like the first four, now paid nothing (100% savings).
The sixth now paid $2 instead of $3 (33% savings).
The seventh now pay $5 instead of $7 (28%savings).
The eighth now paid $9 instead of $12 (25% savings).
The ninth now paid $14 instead of $18 (22% savings).
The tenth now paid $49 instead of $59 (16% savings).

Each of the six was better off than before. And the first four continued to drink for free.

But once outside the restaurant, the men began to compare their savings.

“I only got a dollar out of the $20,” declared the sixth man. He pointed to the tenth man, “but he got $10!”

“Yeah, that’s right,’ exclaimed the fifth man. “I only saved a dollar, too. It’s unfair that he got ten times more than I!”

“That’s true!!”shouted the seventh man. “Why should he get $10 back when I got only $2 ? The wealthy get all the breaks!”

“Wait a minute,” yelled the first four men in unison. “We didn’t get anything at all. The system exploits the poor!”

The nine men surrounded the tenth and beat him up.

The next night the tenth man didn’t show up for drinks, so the nine sat down and had beers without him. But when it came time to pay the bill, they discovered something important. They didn’t have enough money between all of them for even half of the bill!

And that, boys and girls, journalists and college professors, is how our tax system works. The people who pay the highest taxes get the most benefit from a tax reduction. Tax them too much, attack them for being wealthy, and they just may not show up any more. In fact, they might start drinking overseas where the atmosphere is somewhat friendlier.

Courtesy –
David R. Kamerschen, Ph.D.
Professor of Economics, University of Georgia